Malfunction Leads to Loss of Frozen Eggs, Embryos

Malfunction Leads to Loss of Frozen Eggs, Embryos

"And we want to do all that we can to support our patients and families through this hard time", said the clinic.

"We are so very sorry this happened and we want to do all we can to support our patients and families through this very hard time". University Hospitals (UH) officials made the announcement Thursday, adding an investigation is underway.

"It's devastating, it's absolutely devastating", said Patti DePompei, President of University Hospital MacDonald Women's Hospital and Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital.

The failure caused the temperature to rise, ultimately making the eggs and embryos at the facility lose their viability. They must be completely thawed to determine viability, but then can not be refrozen. There has been a temperature fluctuation that may have damaged the stored eggs they said.

"We are so very sorry this happened, and we want to do all that we can to support our patients and families through this very hard time", DePompei said. We have already initiated contact with all of our patients to inform them and respond to their questions, and set up a designated call center to arrange personal meetings or calls with their physicians. They said in a statement, "Right now, our patients come first".

Eggs are frozen in order to postpone pregnancy.

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All of the eggs and embryos have been moved to a working tank, with the hospital asserting that it won't destroy any of them.

University Hospitals notified the patients this week, explaining that a problem with one of two large freezers preserving the specimens at the hospital's fertility center was discovered last Sunday, the Cleveland Plain Dealer reported.

In comments underneath the video message, people expressed frustration and heartbreak at the potential loss of the embryos and eggs, which represented not only a significant financial and medical commitment, but the hope of expanding families.

DePompei stated: 'We are working very very carefully to determine how we can best support them through the process'.

The average cost of fertility treatment can be around $10,000 so the financial impact is expected to be significant.

With more women deciding on a late motherhood, freezing eggs has become increasingly popular.

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